Star Calendar – April 2017

Star Calendar

April 2017

Star C alendar Planets:

Moon and Sun balance on either side of the solstice point on the 7th. They rise and set at the same point on the horizon on that day and make the same path across the sky. One might observe the pair at 4:45PM and imagine the height of summer between them.

Mercury begins the month at greatest elongation, bright and decently visible just after 8:PM or so. He is hasty to depart though, and crosses the near-side of the Sun on the 20th.

Venus is already visible in the morning and will be stationary to the stars by the 12th. She is very tall, waxing less slender and will present a maximally brilliant dawn beacon by the end of the month.

Sun rises/sets steadily more north of east/west and adds an hour and a quarter of daylight over the course of this month.

Mars is seen low in the West at about 7:30 as the month begins and lower and later as the month progresses. Mars and Aldebaran (higher and to the left) look very similar these days. On the evening of the 28th the Moon, Aldebaran and Mars will shine together WNW at about 7:45PM.

Jupiter reaches opposition on the 7th. He is now brightest and closest for the year and is in the middle of his period of backward movement near Spica. Look for the Moon in the mix on the 10th.

Saturn is seen culminating in the early morning and stops in the steam (Milky Way) of the Teapot (Sagittarius) on the 6th to begin this year’s loop.

Star Calendar Days:

  1      Sunrise/set in Spring Valley at 6:39/19:21 (12h42m daylight)

          Day number 91; ¼ of the year has passed

          Mercury shining in low West 8:PM, sets at 9:PM

          Moon in horns of Taurus in evening, West

  6      Saturn stationary, begins retrograde loop at spout of Teapot

          Moon passes close to Regulus during this night

  7      Jupiter at opposition, brightest and nearest for the year

  9      Mercury stationary, then retrograde to stars, already retreating Sunwards

10      Moon clusters with bright Jupiter and Spica, ESE in evening

10-11 Full Pink Moon at 2:08AM  (leaf buds are pink)

11      Passover begins

12      Venus stationary, to direct motion

16      Moon with Saturn in south at 5:30AM

          Easter

20      Mercury, so recently visible, at inferior conjunction

22-23 Moon and Venus present the same phase, East at 5:30AM, use binoculars

26      Venus most brilliant for this appearance

28      Moon strikes a pose with Aldebaran and Mars, around 9:PM, West

30      Sunrise/set in Spring Valley at 5:55/19:52 (13h57m daylight)

          More than 2 ½ hours additional daylight since March 1st

          Midway from equinox to solstice, and about 1/3 of year has passed

          Venus covers greatest sky area for this appearance

Star Calendar – March 2017

Star Calendar

March 2017

 

Star Calendar Planets:

Moon cycles determine, or play a role in, some calendars such as the Islamic and Hebrew. The Islamic year is strictly lunar while the Hebrew is a hybrid luni-solar that inserts extra months so that the seasons don’t drift too far. The Hebrew year begins with Nissan. It commemorates the emancipation of the Jewish people from bondage in Egypt (Exodus) and Passover (whilst Rosh Hashanah commemorates the birth of the World). The Crucifixion is recorded in relationship to Passover and Easter is placed in such a way as to respect this correspondence. This year Nissan begins at sundown on the 27th of March, 15 Nissan (beginning of Passover) on the evening of April 11, and Easter on April 12. This year both Western and Eastern traditions correspond to the same day.

Mercury crosses the far side of the Sun and then appears already on the 18th next to Venus in evening.

Venus is now nearer to Earth than to the Sun as she streaks from evening to morning. On the 25th Venus is more than twice as far from the Sun than from the Earth – the ratio being just about 5:2. Venus begins the month stationary to the stars, then rapidly departs and crosses the nearside of the Sun by the 25th. She will be seen in the pre-dawn east already in early April.

Sun is rapidly increasing its presence in the sky by adding almost 3 minutes of daylight to each day. Of course, as we gain an abundance of daylight – the Govt. must naturally order us to start “saving” it.

Mars is seen to the right of the crescent Moon on the evenings of the 1st and again on the 30th.

Jupiter begins March near Spica and we can watch him move, retrograde, back away from Spica as the month proceeds. The pair rises about two hours after sunset and is joined by the Moon on the 14th.

Saturn slows his slow shuffle – that is so slow that he lingers in each seasonal quarter of the sky for over 7 years.

Star Calendar Days:

1 Sunrise/set in Spring Valley at 6:30/17:47 (11h17m daylight)
    Day number 60; about 1/6 of the year has passed
    Moon to left of Mars at dusk in west
    Moon and Venus in same crescent phase (use binoculars) as they set

2 Venus stationary to stars, prepares for dash across near side of Sun (25th)

4 Moon approaches to very near Aldebaran, dusk to midnight

6 Mercury crosses the far side of the Sun; superior conjunction

10 Moon moves away from Regulus this evening

11-12 Absent an Executive Order from the President, American clocks shift forward
      Full Crow, Worm, or Sap Moon at 10:54AM Daylight Shifted Time

14 Day 73 number; about 1/5 of the year has passed – and it’s Pi-day too
      Moon, Jupiter and Spica appear together at 10:PM ESE

16-17 Etymological equinox = equal night; Sun is down 12 hours and zero minutes

18- Mercury appears to left of Venus in gloaming – perfect Western view at 8:PM

20 Astronomical equinox at 6:29 – Sun’s center crosses celestial equator
      Sunrise/set in Spring Valley at 6:59/19:09 (12h10m daylight)
      Moon above Saturn around 6:AM, they culminate at sunrise

25 Venus streaks across near side of Sun; inferior conjunction

27-28 New Moon begins Hebrew month of Nisan – that places Passover and Easter

31 Sunrise/set in Spring Valley at 6:41/19:20 (12h39m daylight)
      Day number 90; nearly ¼ of the year has passed
      Enjoying the additional 1 hour and 22 minutes of daylight?